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World NET Cancer Awareness Day

Today is Worldwide Neuroendocrine Tumor Awareness Day. Thank you for taking the time to follow my blog and be a part of my life. Just by doing so you already know so much more about NETs than the average bear.

Steve Jobs of Apple; Dave Thomas, the founder of Wendy’s; and Derrick Bell, the famous black Professor of Law at Harvard,  all passed away from Neuroendocrine Tumor or Carcinoid.  Unfortunately, there are other famous people and numerous not-so-famous people with NET/Carcinoid, that probably don’t know it, yet, due to not experiencing symptoms, or from being misdiagnosed.

You can learn more about this disease by visiting carcinoid.org, and help spread awareness throughout the year by writing the words: “Neuroendocrine Tumor/Carcinoid Cancer” when you contribute to wonderful organizations such as “Relay For Life,” that do not acknowledge this rare cancer.

As for me, I’m still fighting off a cold that has taken advantage of my compromised immune system. All things considered I’m feeling okay after my last treatment, just incredibly tired and run down. I had my usual gamut of follow-up lab work yesterday. On Monday I start my regimen of 3x-a-day injections of octreotide that will last until Kathy and I return to Houston for Round 3 on December 4th.

Take care, and as always, thanks for visiting.

Visit with My Oncologist

I just met with my oncologist today. This was a regularly scheduled follow-up to my first two PRRT treatments. I’ll come back and see him again when all four treatments are complete, probably in late February. He is pleased with how things are progressing, and confident that I’ll see substantial benefit from this therapy, particularly after all four doses are administered.

It’s been two weeks since my trip to Houston, and I’m still feeling wrung out, sick to my stomach, and having to make way too many trips to the bathroom. If this is anything like the first round I should start feeling quite a bit better in another week or so. I was hoping that this time would be easier on me, but no such luck. My doctor today said that I can take more “rescue injections” of octreotide at home to help ease some of the symptoms.

I’m back at the office on a regular basis, working as many hours as I can tolerate. At home Kathy is a saint – putting up with my issues while dealing with her own (including a sprained ankle right now). I’m looking forward to feeling significantly better by Thanksgiving so I can enjoy our big family celebration.

I’ll post again soon. Thanks for stopping by.

The Dreaded MRI

Well enough about the weather already because apparently my ranting isn’t going to drop the mercury one bit.

Here’s a picture of the wonderful home we’re staying at in Spring TX with some old friends, Mary and Russ and their two sons. It’s really great to have a comfortable environment and some excellent home cooking during this adventure.

Today involved two scans in the same apparatus with a similar nuclear injection. They were octreoscans, where the isotopes bind to my tumors so they can get a good idea of how effectively the real therapy next week will also bind to my tumors. Tomorrow and Friday will each entail an additional octreoscan to track that effectiveness over time.

I also had an MRI today. I don’t care what anybody tells you or where you have it done, but when you’re 6’2” with broad shoulders squeezing into a little tube with your arms bent over your head while a loud machine screams at you for a prolonged period of time is never fun. It’s all part of the process however and I know that the images are invaluable in displaying very clear pictures of my tumors.

The good news is that I’m back on my octreotide injections this evening and am already feeling a little better. I’ll be on them until Sunday night when I’ll have to go off again to prepare for next Wednesday’s therapy.

The other PRRT patient that we met was on a second scanner in the same room with me today. She and I spoke briefly this afternoon, and of course we’re both very hopeful for great results from this therapy. She has also been off her injections for a couple days so we were commiserating. This is all a little easier with a shared experience.

Tomorrow will be another octreoscan and a PET scan (which I’ve never had before). I’ll post more after that. Take care y’all.